Choosing the Right Frame for Your Art is Difficult


 

Picking the right frame for your work is difficult. All we have to do is mention the word "frame" and most artists lean towards the "do-it-yourself" approach. We don't blame them either, because most custom framers tend to overcharge for their services. What most framers don't understand is that artists, designers, and collectors work in two-dimension. Framing costs increase their bottom-line, thus affecting the way they price their work and products. Most artists agree that finding a good, local framer is an exhausting process. We're here to break that mold. We aim to work within margins in order for everyone to reap the fruits of the labor that goes into custom framing.

Finding the Right Frame

Art can be breathtaking, but can easily go unnoticed when framed with the "wrong" custom moulding. It's also incorrect to call a frame "wrong", because everyone has different tastes. The "right" frame is subjective to the artwork's owner's taste and preference.

Use your creativity to accentuate your artwork when selecting a frame. Some art calls for minimal, simple frames. Other artwork demands ornate, complex designs on the moulding. Get used to putting your artistic eye to work to find the perfect match for your work. Aim for consistency across sets of frames. This ultimately helps in the design process when hanging, as well.

How Much Should You Spend on a Frame 

Custom frames can range anywhere between $30 and thousands of dollars. If you've done your research into standard framing costs, some of the most reputable artists today spend a decent percentage of their work's retail cost when deciding on a frame (somewhere between 5-15%).

Here's an example as an interior designer:

If a designer is selling a piece of art for a room to a client at $500, then their framing budget would fall around $30-$75. That would be for a simple frame that brings more attention to the piece.

"Now when you price out the art work you can raise the price of the artwork in order to afford the frame and increase the value of your work."

Anther way to look at framing costs is to pick the frame you absolutely love no matter the price tag. Say the frame is $500, you'd divide it by 15% to increase the price of the art work. 500 / .15 = $3333. Now when you price out the art work you can raise the price of the artwork in order to afford the frame and increase the value of your work.

Hope these tips make choosing the right frame a little bit easier!